How to Trigger Insurance Coverage for an ERISA Claim

Posted By Stephen D. Rosenberg In 401(k) Plans , Coverage Litigation , Defense Costs , Directors and Officers , Duty to Defend , Employment Practices Liability Insurance , Exclusions , New York Insurance Bad Faith Law
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Well, how can I not comment on this, given the focus of both this blog and my practice? The Second Circuit was just presented with the question of whether an insurer has to provide a defense to a company and its officer, under the employee benefits liability portion of a policy, for an ERISA claim related to a retaliatory discharge/reclassification claim brought by an employee of the insured. The employee claimed, in essence, that she had been retaliated against for complaining of sexual harassment.

Now, coverage by insurers for complaints alleging sexual harassment or similar claims under standard CGL policies have their own complicated backstory, revolving around the question of whether, no matter what is actually alleged in the complaint by the employee, the acts in question are intentional, dishonest or otherwise harmful in a manner that precludes coverage. Some of this history goes back to at least the 1980s, and, having been involved with a client’s rollout of the coverage, it played a role to some degree in the creation and eventual acceptance of EPLI – or employment practices liability insurance – coverage.

The insurer here took the same tack with regard to the ERISA claim at issue, and, given the history noted above and the nature of the claim, understandably so. The issue, though, as the Second Circuit found, is that the ERISA claim itself did not require any type of intentional misconduct, which is basically true across the board with most types of ERISA claims, and held that the insurer therefore could not deny coverage for the ERISA claim based on an exclusion for dishonest or malicious acts. The Court found that the ERISA claim could, in essence, simply be a claim for negligent conduct – at least as pled in the complaint – and thus the insurer could not deny a defense to the insured based on such an exclusion, which would not reach a claim of negligence.

There are a number of lessons here for both insured companies (and their officers) who are sued in ERISA cases and for their insurers. First, don’t assume that principles related to coverage of employment related claims will transfer to an ERISA claim; they may very well not do so. Second, you have to pay close attention to the true nature of an ERISA claim (including its key legal elements) before deciding whether or not there is coverage, and not simply to the surrounding factual allegations relating to the insured’s conduct (which in most harassment and similar claims are usually pretty egregious, at least as alleged by the plaintiff).

Anyway, here is the decision, which is Euchner-USA, Inc. v. Hartford Casualty Insurance Company, and here is an article providing a nice summary, for those of you who don’t want to read the full decision.
 

New York Bad Faith Law

Posted By Stephen D. Rosenberg In New York Insurance Bad Faith Law
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Sometimes it is fun to see what other states do. Here in Massachusetts, insurer bad faith claims are for all intents and purposes a product of statute, and the statute authorizes multiple damages and awards of attorney's fees to a prevailing plaintiff. Hence, there is a significant amount of bad faith litigation in this jurisdiction.

As part of an upcoming Defense Research Institute publication on insurance bad faith law, I contributed a review and overview of New York law on insurance bad faith. New York does not grant such a broad right of action, and in fact does not even allow a private statutory right of action. This and more is in the New York section of the materials.